Bosque de Rio Tigre

March 28-31, 2023

 

Bird List 

Seen  -  127

Heard  -  22

Total Species  -  149

Bosque de Rio Tigre Lodge

Image

 

The bird life here never disappoints. The handcrafted wood lodge is just steps from the Rio Tigre, and backed by a hillside of primary forest, just steps from bird-friendly habitat in a mix of secondary forest, ponds, and pasture. The lodge is also just a 10-minute walk from a new entrance to Corcovado National Park.

 

 

From a hammock on the terrace, we could observe an Orange-collared Manakin tending to youngsters in a nest. Just a few steps along a trail, we observed a boa constrictor advancing along a branch in search of prey. 

 

 

A short jungle trail leads to a nearby pond, dug out by gold-diggers and now home to Boat-billed Herons

 

 

Boat-billed Heron

Boat-billed Heron

Crossing the river involved walking along a log footbridge, steadied by a handrail of branches.

Footbridge crossing the river

footbridge

Bosque de Rio Tigre Lodge

Bosque de Rio Tigre Lodge

 

Every morning, a sprinkling of rice from the open-air kitchen attracted a mix of pigeons, doves, and agoutis.

Agouti outside kitchen area

agouti

The water level in the river at this time of year is quite low, but just deep enough for a cooling bath, which the ladies took full advantage of every afternoon. 

Ladies bathing in the river

swimmers

Mornings start at 5:30, with excellent coffee and just-baked banana bread. Our first hike on Wednesday was the most strenuous, up a winding trail through primary forest, accompanied by a chorus of Chestnut-backed Antbirds.

At the top we had views across the river to Corcovado National Park, with Scarlet Macaws flying overhead, along with Mealy, Red-lored, White-crowned parrots and Crimson-fronted Parakeets. An Orange-collared Manikin lek is easily accessed from the mud road, which at this drier time of year posed no slipping problems.

After a cooling afternoon thunderstorm, we walked along the river, spotting egrets, sandpipers, and herons.

Macaw

Macaw

Beach

Beach

After lunch, we took a stroll through the village, toward the Corcovado Park entrance, catching sight of twenty or more species, and spent some time watching a pair of toucans raiding a bird's nest and emerging with tiny legs -- hatchlings, sadly -- spilling out of their bills.

Fred found his spot

Fred

Village kids on the way to school

Village kids on the way to school

As usual, the food service, from breakfasts through lunches and dinners was healthy, varied and always delicious, featuring local fruits and vegetables, fresh fish, chicken and home-baked bread, with fresh-squeezed orange juice at breakfast and wine, beer and fruit refrescos at dinner, and after-dinner herbal teas. A mango crisp was the standout dessert.

Time to Eat

Time to Eat

Thursday morning we set off in cars, birding along a dirt road, with good looks at Gray-lined Hawk, a Roadside Hawk nest and Red-breasted Meadowlarks, among dozens of other species. 

We drove on to Playa Sándalo, edged by mangrove trees, and spotted the endemic Mangrove Warbler, although we missed the Mangrove Hummingbird. Scores of titi monkeys were active in the trees and one managed to aim a hard almond fruit directly onto my head.

Members at the beach

Members at the beach

Mangrove

Mangrove

Titi monkeys

Titi monkeys

Friday, before breakfast, we hiked through the village to the wider branch of the Rio Tigre and bird-watched from the high trestle bridge.

Helping to steady that hand

Helping to steady that hand

To get the White-necked Puff Bird

To get the White-necked Puff Bird

Participants: Dorothy, Jorge & Marguerite, Lyn & Fred, Howard

Guide: Abraham from Bosque de Rio Tigre Lodge

Trip Report: Dorothy

It was a truly wonderful trip and a great way to get back into birding. We thank Liz and Abraham for being such great hosts and allowing us to enjoy the beauty that they spend so much time in.

Liz, Dorothy and Abraham

Liz, Dorothy and Abraham

Our Group

Our Group

Our new member, Howard, has a very steady hand and here is a sampling, limited due to size and space.

Other images he shared that are not here are Black-faced Antthrush, Cattle Egret, Cherrie's Tanager M, Gray-headed Tanager, Gray-lined Hawk, Green Kingfisher, Lineated Woodpecker, Little Blue Heron, Palm Tanager, Spotted Sandpiper, Swallow-tailed Kite, Thick-billed Seed Finch, and a few unknowns.

Enjoy his pictures below, including Baird's Trogon, Black-mandibled Toucan, Blue Ground-Dove M&F, Buff-throated Saltator, Cherrie's Tanager F, Common Tody Flycatcher, Flycatcher- Myiobius, Gray-chested Dove, Martin, Roadside Hawk, Ruddy-breasted Seedeater, Thick-billed Euphonia

Click on an image to enlarge it.

Bird List for Bosque de Rio Tigre - March 28-31, 2023
Seen Heard
Little Tinamou Common Pauraque 
Bare-throated Tiger Heron Short-billed Pigeon 
Green Heron White-crowned Parrot 
Little Blue Heron Striped Cuckoo 
Cattle Egret Black-throated Trogon 
Great Egret Blue-crowned/Lesson’s Motmot 
Boat-billed Heron Olivaceous Piculet 
Fasciated Tiger-Heron Black-striped Woodcreeper 
White Ibis Slaty Spinetail 
Southern Lapwing Great Antshrike 
Spotted Sandpiper Paltry Tyrannulet 
Whimbrel Slate-Headed Tody-Flycatcher 
Purple Gallinule Bright-rumped Attila 
Black Vulture Rufous Mourner 
Turkey Vulture Great Crested Flycatcher 
King Vulture Boat-billed Flycatcher 
Crane Hawk Long-billed Gnatwren 
Swallow-tailed Kite Black-bellied Wren 
Pearl Kite Green Shrike-Vireo 
White Hawk Streaked Saltator 
Roadside Hawk Black-striped Sparrow 
Double-toothed Kite Spot-crowned Euphonia 
Broad-winged Hawk  
Gray-lined Hawk  
Yellow-Headed Caracara  
White-collared Swift  
Costa Rican Swift  
Mangrove Swallow  
Gray-breasted Martin  
Southern Rough-winged Swallow  
Band-tailed Barbthroat  
Stripe-throated Hermit  
White-necked Jacobin  
Scaly-breasted Hummingbird  
Charming Hummingbird  
Rufous-tailed Hummingbird  
Long-billed Starthroat  
Pale-vented Pigeon  
Gray-chested Dove  
White-tipped Dove  
Common Ground Dove  
Ruddy Ground Dove  
Blue Ground Dove  
Ruddy Quail-Dove  
Crimson-fronted Parakeet  
Orange-chinned Parakeet  
Brown-hooded Parrot  
Scarlet Macaw  
Red-lored Parrot  
Mealy Parrot  
Barid’s Trogon  
Slaty-tailed Trogon (M&F)  
Ringed Kingfisher  
Green Kingfisher  
Fiery-billed Aracari  
Black-mandibled Toucan  
Golden-naped Woodpecker  
Red-crowned Woodpecker  
Lineated Woodpecker  
Plain Xenops  
Cocoa Woodcreeper  
Streak-headed Woodpecker  
Scaly-throated Leaf Tosser  
Buff-throated Foliage-Gleaner  
Black-hooded Antshrike  
Russet Antshrike  
Chestnut-backed Antbird  
Dot-winged Antwren  
Black-faced Antthrush  
Yellow Tyrannulet  
Southern Beardless Tyrannulet  
Yellow-bellied Elaenia  
Piratic Flycatcher  
Common Tody Flycatcher  
Sulphur-rumped Flycatcher  
Ochre-bellied Flycatcher  
Eye-ringed Flatbill  
Tropical Pewee  
Great Kiskadee  
Social Flycatcher  
Gray-capped Flycatcher  
Streaked Flycatcher  
Tropical Kingbird  
Black-crowned Tityra  
Masked Tityra  
Cinnamon Becard  
White-winged Becard  
Orange-collared Manakin  
Red-capped Manakin  
Rufous Piha  
Turquoise Cotinga  
Clay-colored Thrush  
Tropical Gnatcatcher  
Riverside Wren  
Plain Wren  
House Wren  
Scaly-breasted Wren  
Northern Waterthrush  
Mangrove Warbler  
Wilson’s Warbler  
Gray-headed Tanager  
White-shouldered Tanager  
Scarlet-rumped Tanager  
White-throated Shrike-Tanager  
Palm Tanager  
Blue-gray Tanager  
Golden-hooded Tanager  
Bay-headed Tanager  
Red-legged Honeycreeper  
Bananaquit  
Blue-black Grassquit  
Thick-billed Seed-Finch  
Variable Seedeater  
White-collared Seedeater  
Ruddy-breaster Seedeater  
Buff-throated Saltator  
Orange-billed Sparrow  
Black-cheeked Ant-tanager  
Summer Tanager  
Red-breasted Blackbird  
Melodious Blackbird  
Bronzed Cowbird  
Great-tailed Grackle  
Baltimore Oriole  
Yellow-crowned Euphonia   
White-vented Euphonia  
Spot-crowned Euphonia  

Our Club in Numbers

98

Members in the

 BCCR

61

Countries of Origin of

FB Followers

117

Different

Locations Visited

754

Different

Species Seen